Small spores, but potentially big impact!

Introduction to our ‘Guest Blog’ below (by Shelagh McCartan)

During December, I was routinely assessing seeds that had failed to germinate during a germination test. Sometimes, ungerminated seeds can be overwhelmed by various moulds, particularly when incubated at warm temperatures for a few weeks.  On this occasion, I spotted an unusual-looking mould, which I passed onto Caroline Gorton for identification. She identified it as an Aspergillus mould – from which a person can develop health problems. It is, therefore, important to be aware of this, and take the necessary precautions. The bottom line is to ‘work smart and stay safe’!

Guest Blog by Caroline Gorton (Diagnostician in the Tree Health Advisory and Diagnostic Service, Forest Research, Britain)

Aspergillus is a ubiquitous mould found in air and soil.  Aspergillus, like other moulds, thrives in humid environments and spores can reach high levels in damp housing and compost.  Most people are immune to infection; however, people with damaged lungs, allergies or a compromised immune system may develop aspergillosis.  The type of disease can vary from an ‘allergy’ type response to life threatening invasive infections.

These images were taken of Aspergillus which had grown in a germination box containing seeds of European silver fir (Abies alba).  As Aspergillus is a common member of the microbial flora, it may well be present on seeds which are incubated and the moist conditions are perfect for its growth.  It is, therefore, worth being aware of when assessing seeds as the spores can cause significant health problems.  It is advisable to work in a well-ventilated environment or to wear a HEPA filter face mask if moulds are present.  Further information is available here.

Aspergillus 3 Aspergillus

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